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London Photography Exhibitions April 2018


London photography exhibitions this April include two very different but equally interesting photographers. In contrast with the modern digital photography featured in her work, Christiane Baumgartner fuses traditional printmaking craftsmanship. On the other hand Jocelyn Lee skillfully uses colour to paint textures in her photography. Christiane Baumgartner work is on display at Alan Cristea while you can see Jocelyn Lee’s work at Huxley-Parlour.

Although it feels like the Gursky exhibition has only just opened, it is coming to an end soon! Also ending soon is a free display at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Into the Woods, at the V&A, closes this weekend. Welsh photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths’ display at TJ Boulting is another exhibition ending this weekend. Read on for further details on all of these, lower down.

See the regularly updated London Photography Galleries list. The London Photography Galleries list compliments this post on London Photography Exhibitions. It contains information such as opening times and maps for the London photography exhibitions.


Christiane Baumgartner: Liquid Light

Closing soon.
Christiane Baumgartner, the German printmaker studied in Leipzig before completing her Masters in Printmaking at the Royal College of Art. She began experimenting with printing photographs using printmaking techniques as she moved to London for her Masters. She consequently became well known for her monochrome woodcuts. Interestingly, Baumgartner’s work combines modern digital photography with traditional craftsmanship to produce handmade prints.

Alan Cristea present Liquid Light, a solo Christiane Baumgartner exhibition. The prints on display depict transient natural phenomena including the effect of sunlight and moonlight on landscape scenes.

Alan Cristea is on Pall Mall, just a short walk from Trafalgar Square and Charing Cross station. Green Park underground station is also a short walk.

Closing soon.
Where: Alan Cristea.
Ends: Saturday, 21st April.
See the
London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Alan Cristea.
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Jocelyn Lee: The Appearance of Things

Just opened.
The Appearance of Things, in a word, is Jocelyn Lee’s examination of the physical world. Jocelyn Lee is know for her portraiture as well as landscape work. Importantly, in her portraiture, she shows an interest in the psychological dimensions of the character. Her landscape work is equally rich, driven by existential themes, her use of richly descriptive colour emphasises textures in the subjects.

Huxley-Parlour present Lee’s first UK solo exhibition. Notably, the show features portrait and landscape work from the artist as well as work from the latest project. The latest project, The Appearance of Things, is ongoing and started taking shape in 2016. Lee has already exhibited widely in notable United States institutions as well as internationally.

Huxley-Parlour is just off Piccadilly. With Fortnum & Mason and the Royal Academy of Arts nearby, it is a short walk from Regent’s Street.

Just opened.
Where: Huxley-Parlour.
Ends: Friday, 11th May.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Huxley-Parlour.
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Martin Parr

Free admission.

This is a permanent display at the Tate Modern, in the Artist rooms. You might remember a recent Daido Moriyama display at Tate Modern. This current Martin Parr display is the same area as that Moriyama one, on the fourth floor of the Boiler House. In addition to prints of famous Matrin Parr images hung on the walls, there is a short video featuring further shots. On the walls you will find work from ‘The Last Resort’ right up to the last decade. The Last Resort, shot in New Brighton, close to Liverpool in 1983 documented British day-trippers enjoying time at the seaside. The resort was a popular working class destination. With north-west England in decline, the work was seen as “an indictment of the market-led economic policies” of the government of the day.

There is another Martin Parr display at Rocket Gallery. ‘Remote Scottish Postboxes’ is the first exhibition of Martin Parr’s medium format series. The series was captured from 2004 up to 2015. Viewing is by appointment until 23rd June.

Tate Modern is on the South Bank of the Thames, and just a few minutes’ walk from St. Paul’s tube station. The show seems like a perfect drop-in on a walk along the South Bank on a sunny spring day. On the same floor at the Tate, you can find an equally interesting display of work by Karl Blossfeldt and Germaine Krull.

Free admission.
Where: Tate Modern: Boiler House Level 4 East.
Ends: Permanent display.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Tate Modern.
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Robert Frank

Free admission.
Robert Frank is a Swiss born photographer. He changed photography when he moved across the Atlantic and produced his book ‘The Americans‘. Even before the book, he garnered support for his unconventional approach, creating a new brand of independently produced street photography. The Americans began a new era in Documentary Photography. Previously the field was about drawing attention to a cause. In contrast, Robert Frank’s photography showed everyday America and ordinary Americans just as they were. At the time it was more common for photographers to publish in magazines rather than books. By persevering with finding a publisher, Robert Frank was able to have more artistic control over his on his work.

Hamiltons present Frank work, not just from America, but also captures made in London and Paris. His seminal trip to a coal-mining village in Wales also makes an appearance. Hamiltons Gallery is in Mayfair, close to Grosvenor Square and a short walk from Green Park tube station. Nobu, on Berkeley street is on the way back to the tube station, if you fancy stopping off for some sushi.

Free admission.
Where: Hamiltons.
Ends: Friday, 11th May.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Hamiltons.
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William Klein: Fashion + Light

Free admission.
William Klein is one of the world’s most influential photographers. Along with Robert Frank (whose work is on show at Hamiltons at the moment), Klein is considered a father of street photography. His fashion work for Vogue was famed. The approach was unconventional, using a wide-angle, lens close up, often outside with natural lighting.

Hackelbury show abstract light images as well as William Klein fashion work. The studio light images predate his fashion work and can be seen on the lower level of the gallery. There is also some rare fashion work as well as the more well-known pieces. If you got to see William Klein + Daido Moriyama at The Tate Modern in 2012, you will definitely recognise some of the pieces. The rare fashion work is studio based using light painting, which the gallery only convinced Klein to release in 2015.

Hackelbury is in South Kensington close to both Gloucester Road and High Street Kensington stations. The gallery staff are surely the most welcoming in London. They are also very knowledgable. Be sure to ask to see Klein’s portrait of footballer Eric Cantona in the end room.

Free admission.
Where: Hackelbury.
Ends: Saturday, 2nd June.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Hackelbury.
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Philip Jones Griffiths: PJGX

Closing soon.
Free admission.
Philip Jones Griffiths, Welsh photojournalist, is chiefly known for his work during the Vietnam War. Significantly, this exhibition marks the tenth anniversary of his passing. Notably the Philip Jones Griffiths Foundation and Magnum Photos made the show possible. The foundation was established in 2000 to further education in the art and science of photography.

Although Griffiths’ Vietnam work is his most recognised, the show does not just focus on that body of work. In fact additionally, there is British documentary work from the 1950s to 70s.

TJ Boulting is in Fitzrovia and a quite short walk from Oxford street. If you are looking for a bar to visit after the show, try the Long Bar on Berners Street.

Closing soon.
Free admission.
Where: TJ Boulting.
Ends: Saturday, 21st April.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: TJ Boulting.
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Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography

Victorian Giants unites early photographers such as Julia Margaret Cameron and Oscar Rejlander. Also included in the list of giants are Lewis Carroll and Lady Clementina Hawarden. Rejlander was initially a painter – he turned to photographer after moving to England. The pioneer mastered the complicated wet-colloidion process for negatives after a three-and-a-half hour crash course in London. Later, he became a teacher to Cameron, Carroll and Lady Hawarden. In fact the four stayed in touch throughout their careers. In spite of this there was some rivalry; Lewis Carroll wrote that ‘he
did not admire Mrs Cameron’s large heads taken out of focus‘.

The art on show is raw, edgy and experimental. This is a ‘jewel-like show of photographs’ – The Telegraph.

The National Portrait Gallery is on St. Martin’s Place. It is near to Leicester Square tube station. Charing Cross station is also just a short walk.

Adult: £13.85 (including £2 donation and £1.85 online transaction fee).
Where: National Portrait Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 20th May.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: National Portrait Gallery.
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Another Kind of Life: Photography on the Margins

Barbican Centre, London Photography Exhibitions April 2018
Another Kind of Life, in short, explores the lives of people who have rejected the mainstream. The works touch on gender and sexuality together with countercultures and subcultures. Twenty photographers are featured including Daido Moriyama, Bruce Davidson and Larry Clark. The range of genres and period covered are also broad. There is not just classic documentary photography; street photography and portraiture also feature. The images date from the 1950s up until present day. This is a blockbuster curation reflecting a more diverse view of the world.

The Barbican Centre is just a couple of minutes’ walk from Barbican tube station. Liverpool Street and Moorgate are also quite close.

Standard Ticket: £13.50 (added donation optional, no booking fee applies).
Where: Barbican Centre.
Ends: Sunday, 27th May.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Barbican Centre.
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Under Cover: A Secret History of Cross – Dressers

Under Cover is a reflection on gender non-conformity. The Photographers’ Gallery display 200 images from Sébastien Lifshitz’s private collection. Interestingly, the images on display are from as far back as the 1880s. They show people from different classes, genders, professions and nationalities.

Many of these are very ordinary portraits… How unremarkable these pictures are, until we realise how precise they are in their studied ordinariness.The Guardian

The Photographers’ Gallery is by Liberty of London, not far from either Oxford Street or Regent Street. The gallery has a great café as well as a print shop.

Free admission before noon every day.
Where: The Photographers’ Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 3rd June.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: The Photographers’ Gallery.
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Andreas Gursky

Closing soon.
Andreas Gursky is a German photographer, formerly a student of influential photographers Hilla and Bernd Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Gursky is now a professor at the Kunstakademie. That hallowed institution was attended by a long list of notable photographers including Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth and Candida Höfer. Gursky is undoubtedly one of the most successful modern photographers with no fewer than six of his photographs featuring in the list of 20 Most Expensive Photos Sold at Auction. Of course, he also has the top spot with ‘Rhein II, 1999‘ which went for £2.7 million at auction in November, 2011.


What makes his photographs so expensive?

First of all the prints are huge; Rhein II is almost 12 feet (16 metres) wide. He uses medium format cameras to capture pictures and then manipulate them digitally, creating abstracts. The purpose of the digital manipulation is not to create fictions, instead to heighten the image of something that exists in the world. Andreas Gursky photographs and a social commentary which reveal “how do we order the world around around us“. It is not just Andreas Gursky’s artistic vision which makes his work so valuable. In addition, his works are rare; of the edition of six which made up Rhein II, four are in museums and only two are in private collections.

Andreas Gursky’s to large-scale photographs of landscapes, people and architecture, captures the modern world in seductive detail. He displays a methodical approach similar to that of Hilla and Bernd Becher who offered him critical training. Similarities can be noted in the use of repitition, the feature of textures, symmetry and pattern. He also counts landscape photographer John Davies and large-format colour photography pioneer Joel Sternfeld amongst those who influenced him. Gursky’s typically uses a high point of view. This is considered democratic in that it gives equal importance to every element in the composition. The result is “somewhere between photography and paintings


Hayward Gallery Reopens

Hayward Gallery, London Photography Exhibitions, South Bank
The Hayward Gallery, on the South Bank has re-opened after a two-year refurbishment with a treat for photography enthusiasts; the first major UK Andreas Gursky retrospective. The gallery present 60 images from the early 80s to Gursky’s latest work. The curator definitely had to include, the most famous Gursky, Rhein II, but there is more recent work. As an example, manipulated images made using high end digital large format cameras. The images are particularly digitally manipulated. As a result the output mimics the initial inspiration; a mobile phone capture from a moving train. This is another social comment on the world around us.

If you are keen to see full scale Gursky work, but find the entrance fee a little high you might consider going to the White Cube Gallery in Bermondsey.

The Brutalist Hayward Gallery is close to Waterloo Tube Station and on the South Bank. It’s a short walk from the Strand so you might consider combining the gallery visit with a Theatreland trip.

Closing soon.
Supporter Standard Ticket: £18.50 (including transaction fee).
Where: Hayward Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 22nd April.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: Hayward Gallery.
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Into the Woods: Trees in Photography

Closing soon.
Free admission.
Into the Woods is a free display on at the V&A Museum which uses photography to explore trees as an inspiration for artists. Some photographs date back to the 1850s and notable photographers featured include Ansel Adams and Alfred Stieglitz. The display is in room 38a of the museum. The V&A will become one of the most comprehensive photography centres in the world. The first phase of the will be ready this autumn.

The V&A Museum is in South Kensington, on Exhibition Road, not more than a few minutes from South Kensington tube station.

Closing soon.
Free admission.
Where: V&A Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 22nd April.
See the London Photography Galleries. That list compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post. We regularly update the list with information on opening times and maps as well as other useful details.
More information: V&A Museum.
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London Photography Exhibitions April 2018

That’s it for this week’s London Photography Exhibitions, look out for next week’s list of London Photography Exhibitions!

We post regularly on London Photography Exhibitions and a wide range of topics from travel to healthy living, each post featuring jfFrank photos. Have a look through our galleries and other posts to find out more about us and our work. You can find other posts here. The site features photo galleries on four themes: Memories, Moments, Escapes & Places. Follow links to explore.


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