London Photography Exhibitions August 2016 - jfFrank online
Tate Britain, Photography Exhibitions London February 2019


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London Photography Exhibitions August 2016

This is a London Photography Exhibitions post from our archives. Click link to see the latest London Photography Exhibitions.


London photography exhibitions this August include the fantastic group exhibition at Beetles+Huxley: An Ideal for Living. If you liked Martin Parr’s ‘Strange and Familiar’ selection of photographs of the British by foreign photographers earlier this year, An Ideal for Living will be right up your street. The exhibition features Martin Parr and work from other British photographers as well as those from beyond these shores. There are photographs from this sceptred isle and beyond at the Travel Photographer of the Year exhibition. Note it has moved east, to Greenwich this year (details below). Read on for details on each of these London photography exhibitions.

Note that some exhibitions are closing soon, so check closing dates below to make sure you don’t miss out.

See the regularly updated London Photography Galleries list. The London Photography Galleries list compliments this post on London Photography Exhibitions, with information on opening times and maps for the London photography exhibitions.


An Ideal for Living

Free admission.
An Ideal fro Living: Photographing Class, Culture and Identity in Modern Britain is a group exhibition featuring photography from Martin Parr, Elliott Erwitt, Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson and other from the 20th century photography hall of fame. Like the Martin Parr curated exhibition Strange and Familiar from earlier this year, photography is used as a medium to study the British. An Ideal for Living has some work in common with Strange and Familar, but the approach is original enough to warrant a visit even if you enjoyed Strange and Familiar. There are some fantastic prints from Emil Otto Hoppe on show.

Beetles+Huxley is just off Piccadilly, not far from Fortnum & Masons or the Royal Academy of Arts and a short walk from Regent’s Street.

Free admission.
Where: Beetles+Huxley.
Ends: Saturday, 17th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Beetles+Huxley.
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Travel Photographer of the Year

Free admission.
Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) has moved to the University of Greenwich this year, though the quality of the the photographs on show is equally as good as in previous years. There are over 80 photographs on show. Particularly impressive are winning images from professional photographer Marsel van Oosten. Adam Tan’s monochrome photographs are also worth looking out for.

The exhibition is within the modern academic building of the University of Greenwich. If the weather is nice, you might consider getting the clipper up the Thames from Tower Bridge to Greenwich to take in views en route. The exhibition is a few minutes walk from the pier and Cutty Sark in Greenwich. They accept Oyster cards on the clipper now, just touch in and out.

Free admission.
Where: University of Greenwich.
Ends: Sunday, 4th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: University of Greenwich.
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Something for Everyone

Something for Everyone is a group exhibition at Mayfair’s Hamiltons Gallery. Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, Robert Mapplethorpe and Herb Ritts appear with work from contemporary masters of photography Erwin Olaf and Tomio Selke.

Hamiltons Gallery is in Mayfair, close to Grosvenor Square and a short walk from Green Park tube station. After seeing the show, as a lunchtime treat you might consider popping in to nearby Nobu for a little sushi on the walk back to Green Park tube station.

Where: Hamiltons.
Ends: Thursday, 15th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Hamiltons.
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William Eggleston Portraits

William Eggleston, master pioneer of colour photography is widely recognised as being responsible for the acceptance of colour photography as an art form. He dropped black and white for colour film at a time when colour photography was only used in commercial advertising. Eggleston’s 1974 exhibition at MoMA entitled ’14 Pictures’ was seen as the acceptance of colour photography by the highest validating institution by Mark Holborn.
William Eggleston was influenced by Henri Cartier-Bresson after reading his Decisive Moment book and also documentary photographer Robert Frank, learning by reading the photographically illustrated books. William Eggleston became known for his rich and complex images, inspired by his native American South.

The World Photography Organisation (WPO) recognised William Eggleston’s contribution to photography in 2013. WPO awarded him the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards’ Outstanding Contribution to Photography.

William Eggleston Portraits is an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery and presents one hundred of William Eggleston’s works. This is the most comprehensive exhibition of William Eggleston’s works ever held. Be sure to look out for the rarely seen early black and white photographs also on show.

Read on for details of the free Black Chronicles display, also on at the National Portrait Gallery.

Admission: £8 (full price with donation, extra online booking fee applies).
Where: National Portrait Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 23rd October.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: National Portrait Gallery.
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Terence Donovan: Speed of Light

Terence Donovan helped redefine British photography in the 1960s. Like David Bailey and Brian Duffy, he took many of the iconic images of the Swinging Sixties, creating a culture which celebrated high fashion.

Terence Donovan: Speed of Light occupying two floors at the Photgraphers’ Gallery reflects the breadth of Terence Donovan’s career, showcasing the originality he brought to the genres he worked in. The exhibition charts his near 40 year career from 1959 to 1996. ‘Speed of Light’ was a phrase used by Terence Donovan to accelerate, energise and provoke. Anyone with an interest in the British Royal Family should look out for the portrait of the late Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Photographers’ Gallery is by Liberty of London, not far from either Oxford Street or Regent Street. There is a great café which also serves nice salads, tea, coffee and cakes.

Where: Photographers’ Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 25th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: The Photographers’ Gallery.
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Environmental Photographer of the Year

Closing soon.
Environmental Photographer of the Year is an exhibition of the very best in environmental photography. The show is at the Royal Geographical Society.

The Royal Geographical Society is at the top of Exhibition Road, on the corner with Kensington Gore, just a stone’s throw from Hyde Park and the Royal Albert Hall.

Closing soon.
Where: Royal Geographical Society.
Ends: Friday, 19th August.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Royal Geographical Society.
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Painting with Light

Painting with Light at Tate Britain explored visual links between paintings and vintage photographs, including Pre-Raphaelite, aesthetic and impressionist works. If you liked the Seduced by Art exhibition at the National Gallery in 2012, this could be one for you.

Where: Tate Britain.
Ends: Sunday, 25th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Tate Britain.
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Edward Barber

Free admission.
Imperial War Mueseum presents acclaimed documentary photographer Edward Barber’s work. This London photography exhibition captures the anti-nuclear protest movement in 1980s Britain.

The Imperial War Museum is on Lambeth Road, close to Elephant & Castle underground and mainline stations.

Free admission.
Where: Imperial War Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 4th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Imperial War Museum.
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A History of Photography: The Body

Free admission.
A History of Photography: The Body is a free display in Gallery 100 at the V&A. They is some fantastic photography on show, including Bill Brandt’s beach captures from the 1950s in which he treats the body as a sculpture and Helmut Newton’s ‘Sie Kommen, Dressed and Undressed’.
The Victoria and Albert (V&A) Museum is in South Kensington, five minutes walk from South Kensington tube station and a short walk from Hyde Park.

Free admission.
Where: Victoria & Albert Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 19th February 2017.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: V&A Museum.
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Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph

Henry Fox Talbot could be considered the father of modern photography. In his lab at Lacock Abbey, near Chippenham in Wiltshire, he invented the process which made the production of photographic paper prints possible. At the time, contemporary, Daguerre’s process (which was invented in conjunction with Niépce) produced only a single Daguerrotype image on a silver-plated copper plate. Fox Talbot’s negative positive process allowed mass production of prints from a single negative, giving birth to modern photography.

Fox Talbot’s calotype photographic process was partly inspired when he was unable to capture the features of a village and distant mountains at Lake Como in Italy using a simple draughtsman’s tool. Though later with he drew on inspiration from the Dutch masters, noting how the mundane can make for captivating photographs in his book ‘The Pencil of Nature‘: “A painter’s eye will often be arrested where ordinary people see nothing remarkable. A casual gleam of sunshine, or a shadow thrown across his path, a time-withered oak, or a moss-covered stone may awaken a train of thoughts and feelings, and picturesque imaginings.” Henry Fox Talbot, The Pencil of Nature.

The Science Museum presents a major new exhibition. “Alongside his technical influence, Talbot’s personal legacy today is undoubtedly the beautiful photographs he produced” – Prospero. On display at ‘The Dawn of Photography’ are original prints the ‘The Pencil of Nature’. Lucky visitors, able to see the exhibition early will be treated to a display of rare daguerrotypes, which the Science Museum was able to procure from French archives until June: the rivalry continues between Daguerre and Fox Talbot. Visitors will be able to see both technologies side-by-side and make their own judgement.

The Science Museum is on Exhibition Road in South Kensington. If you have time, consider going to the Paul Strand exhibition across the road at the Victoria and Albert Museum (details on both below).

Admission: £8 (adult 17+ years).
Where: Science Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 11th September.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Science Museum.
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That’s it for this week’s London Photography Exhibitions, look out for next week’s list of London Photography Exhibitions!

We post regularly on London Photography Exhibitions and a wide range of topics from travel to healthy living, each post featuring jfFrank photos. Have a look through our galleries and other posts to find out more about us and our work. You can find other posts here. The site features photo galleries on four themes: Memories, Moments, Escapes & Places. Follow links to explore.


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