London Photography Exhibitions April 2016


London Photography Exhibitions for April 2016 include the “Through the Looking Glass” exhibition from Cbban-born photographer Abelardo Morell in Mayfair. In South Kensington, the Paul Strand retrospective continues at the V&A while in the City, Martin Parr’s “Unseen City” continues. A few exhibitions are closing soon, including the Saul Leiter retrospective at the Photographers’ Gallery and Mario Cravo Neto’s exhibition in Shoreditch. More details on all of these and more dates below.

See the regularly updated London Photography Galleries list. The London Photography Galleries list compliments this post on London Photography Exhibitions, with information on opening times and maps for the London photography exhibitions.


Abelardo Morell: Through the looking glass

Abelardo Morell, born in Havanna, Cuba and moved, with his family to New York in 1962. He is known for producing pictures which transform and transcend the ordinary and everyday. Morell is fascinated by the optics and practice of photography. He built a camera obscura, a technique where light is allowed to enter a room through a pinhole and an image is projected (inverted) on the opposite wall, thought to exist from as early as 400 BC. The captures can be found in his book ‘Camera Obscura‘, featuring views of Brooklyn Bride, shot from nearby apartments where he set up a camera obscura.

Through the Looking Glass at Beetles & Huxley, in Mayfair featuring Abelardo Morell images. Beetles+Huxley is just off Piccadilly, not far from Fortnum & Masons or the Royal Academy of Arts and a short walk from Regent’s Street.

Admission: Free.
Where: Beetles + Huxley.
Ends: Saturday, 16th April.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Beetles + Huxley.
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Electronic Superhighway (2016-1966)

This is a major exhibition showing the impact of computer and digital technology going back to the 1960s. Electronic Superhighway is a “varied exhibition […] moving back in time from contemporary to early examples of art using digital processes” Charles Harrop Griffiths.

The Whitechapel Gallery is on Whitechapel High Street.

Admission: £13.50 (standard admission, with gift aid).
Where: Whitechapel Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 15th May.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Whitechapel Gallery.
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Performing for the Camera

Performing for the Camera explores the relationship between photography and performance through over 50 seminal photographs. The exhibitions presents the work of photographers such as Cindy Sherman and feature performers from Yves Klein to Yayoi Kusama. The exhibition is broader and more interesting than a narcissistic trope of the selfie, instead “it takes its main focus from the documentation of Performance Art” Art & Photography.

“Poignant, touching, confrontational, painful and joyful” Guardian

“From its earliest beginnings to the age of the selfie, the urge to put on a show for the camera has proved irresistible
Independent

Tate Modern is on the South Bank, across the River Thames from St Paul’s Cathedral. There are so many places to get food along the South Bank from street food to restaurants with fantastic views over the Thames, such as Skylon.

Admission: £16 (adult, with donation).
Where: Tate Modern.
Ends: Sunday, 12th June.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Tate Modern.
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Paul Strand: Photography and Film for the 20th Century

Paul Strand was on of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. Paul Strand decided to become a photographer after a field trip to Alfred Steiglitz’ Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession in New York. Inspired by the photography of Steichen and others on that day he soon went on to produce photographic and painted work received recognition.

The Victoria & Albert Museum is staging the first major British Paul Strand retrospective since his death. Vintage prints from the V&A’s own collection will be on display, amongst some 200 artifacts. Paul Strands 1954 photographs captured in South Uist in the Outer Hebrides are also on show. There is a curator talk on March 18th and the exhibition opens on 19th March with full-priced tickets at £9.

The V&A Museum is in South Kensington, on Exhibition Road, a few minutes from South Kensington tube station. You might want to combine the exhibition visit with a trip to the Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park, which is a short walk from the museum.

Read on for information on the Julia Margaret Cameron: Influence and Intimacy and Alec Soth’s Gathered Leaves exhibitions on the other side of Exhibition Road, at South Kensington’s Science Museum.

Where: Victoria & Albert Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 3rd July.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Victoria & Albert Museum.
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Eminent Domain

Closing soon.
Eminent Domain features the work of Scottish photographer Glen Onwin. Glen Onwin’s Saltmarsh, focusing on landscapes from Dunbar in Scotland.

South Kiosk has just moved south! The new gallery is a short walk from Peckham Rye station.

Closing soon.
Where: South Kiosk.
Ends: Sunday, 3rd April.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: South Kiosk.
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Unseen City: Photos by Martin Parr

Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-loved and most important photographers. Parr critically examines elements of modern life in his intimate, satirical and anthropological photography. He captures the British in quiet villages, at fairs and churches, in supermarkets, in their homes and holiday at the Great British seaside and abroad. A nuanced commentator on the British class system, Martin Parr is best known for his sharp eye and cheeky sense of humour. He is one of the nation’s most celebrated photographers.

Guildhall Art Gallery presents the result of two years’ examination of the eccentricity of the City of London showcasing bizarre rituals at the heart of the European financial capital city. Martin Parr brings to life the pomp and ceremony, traditions and people that are the City of London. For Parr enthusiasts, the short walk over to the Barbican Centre is a must. There you can see the ‘Strange and Familiar‘ exhibition, curated by Martin Parr offering a further take on the British identity.

The Guildhall Art Gallery is in the City of London in Guildhall Yard which is a short walk from Bank Underground Station. To explore another great British institution – the roast dinner – try a takeaway roast from Fuzzy’s Grub on nearby Mason’s Avenue.

Where: Guildhall Art Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 31st July.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Guildhall Art Gallery.
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Vogue 100: A Century of Style

Vogue 100: A Century of Style is a real treat for fashion enthusiasts, packed with glamorous, iconic images of artists, actors and aristocracy. The exhibition showcases showcases the remarkabke range of photography commissioned by Vogue since it’s inception in 1916.

The National Portrait Gallery presents over 280 images from the Condé Nast archives. The National Portrait Gallery is on St. Martin’s Place, a few strides from Leicester Square tube station.

Admission: £19 (full price, with donation).
Where: National Portrait Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 22nd May.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: National Portrait Gallery.
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Mario Cravo Neto: A Serene Expectation of Light

Closing soon.
Brazilian Mario Cravo Neto was known for his black and white photography which represented the Candomblé religion which like Mario Cravo Neto, has roots in Salvador, Bahia. He trained as a sculptor with his father and as a photographer in Berlin and New York under Jack Keueger. He is recognised as one on the most important and influential contemporary Brazilian photographers.

Autograph ABP at Rivington Place put on an exhibition of 40 photographs from two series. ‘The Eternal Now’ comprises 20 black and white portraits while ‘Laróyè’ includes colour prints. The exhibition is curated by Gabriela Salgado.

Rivington Place is in Shoreditch, a short walk from Shoreditch High Street London Overground station. You might consider stopping off at Boxpark, a pop-up shopping centre, on the walk back to the station for a coffee.

Closing soon.
Where: Rivington Place.
Ends: Saturday, 2nd April.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Rivington Place.
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Saul Leiter

Closing soon.
Free admission before 12 noon.
Saul Leiter started taking photographs at the age of twelve, but it wasn’t until receiving encouragement from W. Eugene Smith that he acquired a 35 mm Leica camera which he initally used to shoot in black and white. In 1948 he started using colour and with Robert Frank and Diane Arbus formed was later known as the New York School of photographers. He spent the next 20 years working a s a fashion photographer for the likes of Elle and Vogue.

“…for [Leiter] the camera provided an alternate way of seeing, of framing events and interpreting reality […] he sought out moments of quiet humanity […], forging a unique urban pastoral from the most unlikely of circumstances.” Martin Harrison.

The Photographers’ Gallery pays tribute to Leiter as a photographer with this exhibition which includes his early black and white as well as colour photographs. The Photographers’ Gallery is by Liberty of London, not far from either Oxford Street or Regent Street. There is a great café which also serves nice salads, tea, coffee and cakes.

Closing soon.
Free admission before 12 noon.
Where: The Photographers’ Gallery.
Ends: Sunday, 3rd April.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: The Photographers’ Gallery.
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Lee Miller: A Woman’s War

Lee Miller was one of New York’s top fashion models, working with Edward Steichen amongst other legends of the era. In the 1920s, she left New York for Paris to become an established fine are and fashion photographer. After the breakout of WWII, Lee Miller became an acclaimed War Correspondent for Vogue Magazine. By 1943, she took up an opportunity to work as an accredited photojournalist attached to the American military forces. The exhibition features her work from this time.

When she died in 1977, Lee Miller’s body was cremated and her ashes were spread through her herb garden at Farley Farm House in East Sussex.
‘Lee Miller: A Woman’s War’ is a book published to coincide with the London photography Exhibition, telling the story of the lives’ of women affected by the war.

The Imperial War Museum presents previously unseen images of conflict. The project began several years ago, coming from a conversation with Antony Penrose, Lee Miller’s son. The exhibition puts the Lee Miller’s vision of gender during the conflict centre stage.

“This incredible selection […] cements [Lee Miller’s] position as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century” – Artfund.

The Imperial War Museum is on Lambeth Road, close to Elephant & Castle underground and mainline stations.

Where: Imperial War Museum.
Ends: Sunday, 24th April.
See the London Photography Galleries list which compliments this London Photography Exhibitions post and is regularly updated with information on opening times and maps.
More information: Imperial War Museum.
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That’s it for this week’s London Photography Exhibitions, look out for next week’s list of London Photography Exhibitions!

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